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principle of dark field microscopy

What is principle of dark field microscopy?

What is principle of dark field microscopy?

dark field microscopy of sugar crystals
Dark Field illumination is a technique used to observe unstained samples causing them to appear brightly lit against a dark, almost purely black, background.

Pictured right: Highly magnified image of sugar crystals using darkfield microscopy technique

When light hits an object, rays are scattered in all azimuths or directions. The design of the dark field microscope is such that it removes the dispersed light, or zeroth order, so that only the scattered beams hit the sample.

The introduction of a condenser and/or stop below the stage ensures that these light rays will hit the specimen at different angles, rather than as a direct light source above/below the object.

The result is a “cone of light” where rays are diffracted, reflected and/or refracted off the object, ultimately, allowing you to view a specimen in dark field.

principle of dark field microscopy

principle of dark field microscopy Options Accessories

principle of dark field microscopy Options Accessories

Metallurigcal reflected light brightfield/darkfield microscope.
Metallurgical reflected and transmitted light brightfield/darkfield microscope.
Stereo microscope 420 with darkfield attachment.
Stereo Zoom SMZ-168 microscope with darkfield attachment.
Biological laboratory phase contrast microscope with darkfield for up to 40x.
Biological laboratory microscope BA210 with darkfield slider.
Biological student microscope 162 with darkfield attachment.
Already have a microscope, but your microscope manufacturer does not make a darkfield stop? If there is a filter holder below your condenser, a darkfield stop we carry may work. Or you can mount a coin or circle of another opaque material in the center of a clear disk and put it in the filter holder.

principle of dark field microscopy

What is principle of dark field microscopy?

Have you ever heard of a dark field microscope? While such a name may sound like a sci-fi gadget used to measure black holes, in reality it’s just a handy tool used to view certain types of translucent samples. The average microscope user may not know about the concept of dark field microscopy, yet it can shed new light on the old way of viewing specimens.
Most people who have survived a biology class know what a light field microscope is. This type of scope uses bright field illumination, meaning it floods the specimen with white light from the condenser without any interference. Thus the specimen shows up as a dark image on a light background (or white field if you will).

This type of unit works best with specimens that have natural color pigments. The samples need to be thick enough to absorb the incoming light; so staining is usually paired with this type of microscope.

Plankton illuminated with a dark field microscopeYet what if the specimen is light colored or translucent, like the plankton on the right? It certainly won’t stand out against a strong white background. Additionally, some specimens are just too thin. They cannot absorb any of the light that passes through them, so they appear invisible to the user. This is where the concept of dark field illumination comes in!

Rather than using direct light from the condenser, one uses an opaque disk to block the light into just a few scattered beams. Now the background is dark, and the sample reflects the light of the beams only. This results in a light colored specimen against a dark background (dark field), perfect for viewing clear or translucent details.

On a grand scale, the same thing happens every day when you look up at the sky. Do the stars disappear when it’s light out? Of course not! They’re still there, their brilliance blotted out by the mid-day sun.

If you’re still having a hard time visualizing this concept, think of a dusty room with the light on and the door open. You may feel the dust affecting your breathing, but you probably won’t see it flying through the air.

Now turn off the light and close the door to just a sliver, while leaving the light on in the adjacent room. If you look at that sliver of light coming through the door, you’ll see all sorts of dust motes suspended in it. You’re employing a similar principle when you use dark field illumination!

principle of dark field microscopy

principle of dark field microscopy for point-of-care syphilis diagnosis

syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum. Globally, an estimated 12 million cases of syphilis occur annually. In the United States, 13,997 cases of primary and secondary (infectious) syphilis were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2009, a 3.7% increase from 2008 and a 134% increase from 2000, when a post-war low of 5,979 primary and secondary syphilis cases was reported. Men who have sex with men (MSM) — especially those who are HIV infected — and blacks are disproportionately affected by syphilis. Geographically, urban areas and the Southeastern region of the United States have the highest rates.

Syphilis is most commonly transmitted by skin-to-skin (or mucous membrane) contact. Following exposure, the infection passes through the following stages:

Primary syphilis, characterized by a painless ulcer, called a chancre, usually develops three weeks after exposure (range 10 days to 90 days) at the site of inoculation. The chancre heals spontaneously after several weeks.

Secondary syphilis is most often characterized by a generalized rash that also resolves without treatment. Rash on the palms and soles can also occur, as can systemic manifestations such as fever, malaise, and lymphadenopathy. Given the widely variable nature of the rash and other manifestations of the disease, syphilis has acquired the moniker “The Great Imitator.”

Early (one year) latent syphilis, defined by the absence of signs or symptoms of disease and diagnosed by serologic evidence of infection.

Tertiary syphilis, which affects about a third of untreated patients and manifests with cutaneous, cardiovascular, or neurologic disease.

Syphilis can also be acquired in utero at any stage of pregnancy and lead to congenital syphilis. Routine syphilis screening and treatment in pregnant women has made congenital syphilis rare in the United States.

Approaches to syphilis diagnosis

Because T pallidum is too fragile an organism to be cultured in the clinical setting, diagnostic testing relies on two approaches: direct detection of the organism and indirect evidence of infection.
Syphilis – Treponema pallidum on darkfield.

Direct methods include darkfield microscopy, molecular assays to detect T pallidum DNA, and histopathologic examination of biopsies of skin or mucous membranes (which can also provide indirect evidence of infection, on the basis of patterns of inflammation in the tissue). Direct methods have the advantage, in some cases, of detecting infection before a patient has mounted a measurable antibody response that results in a reactive serologic test result.

principle of dark field microscopy allows visualization of live treponemes obtained from a variety of cutaneous or mucous membrane lesions, as follows.

In primary syphilis, the chancre teems with treponemes that can be seen with darkfield microscopy. The sensitivity of darkfield microscopy for the diagnosis of primary syphilis is approximately 80%. Darkfield sensitivity declines over time and can also decrease if the patient has applied topical antibiotics to the lesion(s). Of note, the mouth harbors normal non-pathogenic treponemes that are indistinguishable microscopically from T pallidum. Therefore, oral specimens cannot be used for darkfield microscopy because of the possibility of false-positive test results.

In secondary syphilis, mucous patches (as long as not oral) and condyloma lata (found in moist areas between body folds) are appropriate specimens for darkfield microscopy. Dry skin lesions usually do not contain sufficient organisms for darkfield testing.

In congenital syphilis, moist discharge from the nose (snuffles) and vesiculobullous lesions of the skin are high-yield specimen sources for darkfield testing.

Indirect methods of diagnosis include serologic testing of blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and detection of CSF abnormalities (elevated white blood cell count or protein) consistent with neurosyphilis. Serologic testing of blood involves demonstration of host antibody to either endogenous antigens (non-treponemal tests) or to antigens of T pallidum (treponemal tests). Non-treponemal tests, including the rapid plasma reagin test and the venereal disease research laboratory test, have historically been used as the initial screening tests for the serologic diagnosis of syphilis. If a patient’s non-treponemal test is reactive, confirmatory testing with a treponemal test is performed, using either the T pallidum particle agglutination test, the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed test, or another treponemal test. A reactive treponemal test confirms the diagnosis of a new or previously treated case of syphilis. If the treponemal test is non-reactive, the positive non-treponemal test result is considered a biologic false-positive that is not diagnostic of syphilis. A newer algorithm that is gaini

principle of dark field microscopy

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