dark field microscopy syphilis vs dark field microscopy syphilis: Which is Better? | dark field microscope,dark field microscope manufacturer.
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dark field microscopy syphilis vs dark field microscopy syphilis: Which is Better?

dark field microscopy syphilis

dark field microscopy syphilis principle

dark field microscopy syphilis principle

dark field microscopy syphilis is a method which also creates contrast between the object and the surrounding field. As the name implies, the background is dark and the object is bright. A annular stop is also used for dark field, but the stop is now outside the field of view. Only light coming from the outside of the beam passes through the object and it cannot be seen directly. Only when light from the stop is deflected and deviated by the object can it be seen. This method also produces a great deal of glare and therefore the specimen often appears as a bright silhouette rather than as a bright object of which much detail can be determined. The following diagram shows the setup of the dark field light path.

dark field microscopy syphilis

What is dark field microscopy syphilis?

What is dark field microscopy syphilis?

Brightfield microscopy uses light from the lamp source under the microscope stage to illuminate the specimen. This light is gathered in the condenser, then shaped into a cone where the apex is focused on the plane of the specimen. In order to view a specimen under a brightfield microscope, the light rays that pass through it must be changed enough in order to interfere with each other (or contrast) and therefore, build an image. At times, a specimen will have a refractive index very similar to the surrounding medium between the microscope stage and the objective lens. When this happens, the image can not be seen. In order to visualize these biological materials well, they must have a contrast caused by the proper refractive indices, or be artificially stained. Since staining can kill specimens, there are times when darkfield microscopy is used instead.

In darkfield microscopy the condenser is designed to form a hollow cone of light , as apposed to brightfield microscopy that illuminates the sample with a full cone of light. In darkfield microscopy, the objective lens sits in the dark hollow of this cone and light travels around the objective lens, but does not enter the cone shaped area. The entire field of view appears dark when there is no sample on the microscope stage. However, when a sample is placed on the stage it appears bright against a dark background. It is similar to back-lighting an object that may be the same color as the background it sits against – in order to make it stand out.

dark field microscopy syphilis

What is Blood and What Does it Do

What is Blood and What Does it Do

Two types of blood vessels carry blood throughout our bodies: The arteries carry oxygenated blood (blood that has received oxygen from the lungs) from the heart to the rest of the body.

The blood then travels through the veins back to the heart and lungs, where it receives more oxygen. As the heart beats, you can feel blood traveling through the body at your pulse points – like the neck and the wrist – where large, blood-filled arteries run close to the surface of the skin.

The blood that flows through this network of veins and arteries is called whole blood. Whole blood contains three types of blood cells:

Red Blood Cells
White Blood Cells
Platelets

These blood cells are mostly manufactured in the bone marrow (the soft tissue inside our bones), especially in the bone marrow of the vertebrae (the bones that make up the spine), ribs, pelvis, skull, and sternum (breastbone). These cells travel through the circulatory system suspended in a yellowish fluid called plasma (pronounced: plaz-muh). Plasma is 90% water and contains nutrients, proteins, hormones, and waste products. Whole blood is a mixture of blood cells and plasma.
Red Blood Cells

Red blood cells (RBCs, and also called erythrocytes, pronounced: ih-rith-ruh-sytes) are shaped like slightly indented, flattened disks. Red blood cells contain an iron-rich protein called hemoglobin (pronounced: hee-muh-glow-bun). Blood gets its bright red color when the hemoglobin in RBCs picks up oxygen in the lungs. As the blood travels through the body, the hemoglobin releases oxygen to the tissues. The body contains more RBCs than any other type of cell, and each has a life span of about 4 months. Each day, the body produces new RBCs to replace those that die or are lost from the body.

White Blood Cells

White blood cells (WBCs, and also called leukocytes, pronounced: loo-kuh-sytes) are a key part of the body’s system for defending itself against infection. They can move in and out of the bloodstream to reach affected tissues. The blood contains far fewer white blood cells than red cells, although the body can increase production of WBCs to fight infection. There are several types of white blood cells, and their life spans vary from a few days to months. New cells are constantly being formed in the bone marrow.

Several different parts of blood are involved in fighting infection. White blood cells called granulocytes (pronounced: gran-yuh-low-sytes) and lymphocytes (pronounced: lim-fuh-sytes) travel along the walls of blood vessels. They fight germs such as bacteria and viruses and may also attempt to destroy cells that have become infected or have changed into cancer cells.

Certain types of WBCs produce antibodies, special proteins that recognize foreign materials and help the body destroy or neutralize them. Someone with an infection will often have a higher white cell count than when he or she is well because more WBCs are being produced or are entering the bloodstream to battle the infection. After the body has been challenged by some infections, lymphocytes “remember” how to make the specific antibodies that will quickly attack the same germ if it enters the body again.
Platelets

Platelets (also called thrombocytes, pronounced: throm-buh-sytes) are tiny oval-shaped cells made in the bone marrow. They help in the clotting process. When a blood vessel breaks, platelets gather in the area and help seal off the leak. Platelets survive only about 9 days in the bloodstream and are constantly being replaced by new cells.

Drop of Blood

Blood also contains important proteins called clotting factors, which are critical to the clotting process. Although platelets alone can plug small blood vessel leaks and temporarily stop or slow bleeding, the action of clotting factors is needed to produce a strong, stable clot.

Platelets and clotting factors work together to form solid lumps to seal leaks, wounds, cuts, and scratches and to prevent bleeding inside and on the surfaces of our bodies. The process of clotting is like a puzzle with interlocking parts. When the last part is in place, the clot happens – but if only one piece is missing, the final pieces can’t come together.

When large blood vessels are severed (or cut), the body may not be able to repair itself through clotting alone. In these cases, dressings or stitches are used to help control bleeding.

In addition to the cells and clotting factors, blood contains other important substances, such as nutrients from the food that has been processed by the digestive system. Blood also carries hormones released by the endocrine glands and carries them to the body parts that need them.

dark field microscopy syphilis

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