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6 questions to ask yourself before you dark field microscopy blood analysis.

dark field microscopy blood analysis

What is dark field microscopy blood analysis?

What is dark field microscopy blood analysis?

dark field microscopy of sugar crystals-Dark Field illumination is a technique used to observe unstained samples causing them to appear brightly lit against a dark, almost purely black, background.Pictured right: Highly magnified image of sugar crystals using darkfield microscopy technique,When light hits an object, rays are scattered in all azimuths or directions. The design of the dark field microscope is such that it removes the dispersed light, or zeroth order, so that only the scattered beams hit the sample.The introduction of a condenser and/or stop below the stage ensures that these light rays will hit the specimen at different angles, rather than as a direct light source above/below the object.The result is a “cone of light” where rays are diffracted, reflected and/or refracted off the object, ultimately, allowing you to view a specimen in dark field.

dark field microscopy blood analysis

What dark field microscopy blood analysis Applications

 

Viewing blood cells (biological darkfield microscope, combined with phase contrast)
Viewing bacteria (biological darkfield microscope, often combined with phase contrast)
Viewing different types of algae (biological darkfield microscope)
Viewing hairline metal fractures (metallurgical darkfield microscope)
Viewing diamonds and other precious stones (gemological microscope or stereo darkfield microscope)
Viewing shrimp or other invertebrates (stereo darkfield microscope)

In darkfield microscopy, contrast is created by a bright specimen on a dark background. It is ideal for revealing outlines, edges, boundaries, and refractive index gradients but does not provide a great deal of information about internal structure. Ideal subjects include living, unstained cells (where darkfield illumination provides information not visible with other techniques), although fixed stains cells can also be imaged successfully. Darkfield imaging is particularly useful in haematology for the examination of fresh blood. Non-biological specimens include minerals, chemical crystals, colloidal particles, inclusions and porosity in glass, ceramics, and polymer thin sections.

dark field microscopy blood analysis

What is a dark field microscopy blood analysis?

What is a dark field microscopy blood analysis? The dark field microscopic examination of freshly collected, vital blood is a pillar of the Paracelsus Clinica al Ronc holistic medical diagnosis. It provides information on the internal milieu and function of the blood cells, as well as the amount and development of endobionts, from which microorganisms and more sophisticated structures, such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses, develop.

dark field microscopy blood analysis

What is Conclusion about dark field microscopy blood analysis

A dark field microscopy blood analysis can offer brilliant, light images against a dark background of otherwise difficult to view specimens.

Most standard microscopes come with dark field capabilities or accessories to enable this illumination technique.

There are many practical applications of dark field, especially in the field of marine biology, in viewing the many specimens you cannot see using alternative techniques.

However, a researcher must keep in mind the potential issues and limitations that may arise from dark field illumination.

For further information, check out the many microscopy imaging techniques available.

dark field microscopy blood analysis

dark field microscopy blood analysis Excludes Scleroderma in Raynaud’s

 

he absence of a systemic sclerosis (SSc) nailfold pattern in patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon or suspected connective tissue disease is of high clinical value as a biomarker to rule out SSc, according to a large cohort study from the U.K.

For identifying patients who met the 2013 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism or the Very Early Diagnosis of Systemic Sclerosis (VEDOSS) criteria for SSc, the study found that a nailfold capillaroscopy pattern had a negative predictive value of 90% (95% CI 86 to 93), according to Maya H. Buch, MBChB, PhD, and colleagues from the University of Leeds, writing in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.

That pattern also had a sensitivity of 71% (95% CI 61 to 80), a specificity of 95% (95% CI 91 to 97), and a positive predictive value of 84% (95% CI 74 to 91).

“We were very impressed with nailfold capillaroscopy’s utility in negative prediction,” Buch said in an interview with MedPage Today. “The most valuable result here is the low likelihood of scleroderma in patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon who do not have any scleroderma-specific features on nailfold capillaroscopy. In practice, this means we can more confidently reassure such a patient and discharge care back to the patient’s general practitioner.”

The researchers noted that to the best of their knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the absence of any SSc pattern on nailfold capillaroscopy maintains its known negative predictive value, including for patients with secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon, who are considered at increased risk of SSc. “This study is only one of two to include a large unselected cohort of patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon — mirroring clinical practice in which rheumatology departments frequently receive referrals of patients with Raynaud’s from GPs,” Buch said.

Primary Raynaud’s phenomenon is associated with normal microcirculation architecture, whereas microangiopathies are associated with secondary Raynaud’s, she explained. The SSc nailfold capillaroscopy pattern correlates with disease duration and severity, and also predicts future vascular and visceral organ damage. Nailfold capillaroscopy also detects vascular problems in glaucoma.

Although an SSc nailfold capillaroscopy pattern is sometimes present in other connective tissue diseases, “nailfold capillaroscopy could be performed to provide reassurance to the rheumatologist in the assessment of both [primary and secondary] Raynaud’s phenomenon,” the researchers wrote.

Buch and colleagues studied 347 patients referred for nailfold capillaroscopy to a tertiary-care center from January 2009 to October 2013. The mean age of the cohort was 47 years and 83% were female. Clinical review showed that 54 patients (16%) did not have true Raynaud’s phenomenon, 69 (20%) had primary Raynaud’s, 172 (50%) had secondary Raynaud’s, and 52 (15%) had SSc.

At referral, 46 patients (89%) met either VEDOSS or the 2013 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria for SSc. Of the patients with secondary Raynaud’s, 71 (41%) were being managed for connective tissue disease or inflammatory arthritis, while 101 (59%) had an antibody and/or a red-flag feature for SSc.

A nailfold capillaroscopy pattern for SSc was detected in 80 patients (23%) — 43 with early, 31 with active, and six with late-pattern vasculopathy. This pattern was observed in 37 patients (71%) diagnosed with SSc, 30 (17%) with secondary Raynaud’s, nine (13%) with primary Raynaud’s, and four (7%) without Raynaud’s.

Considering only those patients with non-SSc connective tissue disease or inflammatory arthritis, 16 of 71 patients (23%) had an SSc pattern. This was detected in two of five patients with SLE, eight of 42 with undifferentiated connective tissue disease, four of six with mixed connective tissue disease, one of three with Sjogren’s syndrome, and one of 14 with inflammatory arthritis.

Interestingly, the team said, participants meeting ACR/EULAR criteria were more likely to have an SSc nailfold capillaroscopy pattern than those meeting the VEDOSS criteria were: 84% versus 42%, respectively. “This may be related to the earlier stage of disease in those meeting VEDOSS with less time for detectable vasculopathic changes at the nailfold to develop,” the researchers wrote. “These findings are important as the earlier detection and management of SSc may lead to reduced morbidity and earlier detection of its complications.”

Among the study limitations were the lack of formal measurements to determine enlarged capillaries and the use of two different nailfold capillaroscopy methods, which might have introduced bias. As in clinical practice, the examiners were not blinded to the clinical diagnosis, possibly introducing investigator bias. In addition, the retrospective analysis may have missed important data, particularly the presence of telangiectasia.

The authors cited the need for larger, more defined prospective studies of a heterogeneous group of Raynaud’s patients. Buch noted that the current study is part of a larger Leeds program to identify biomarkers for accurately identifying patients at risk for scleroderma or those with scleroderma at risk for poorer outcomes.

dark field microscopy blood analysis

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