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Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy Here’s Quick Way Know

What is Bright field microscopy?

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright-field microscopy is the simplest of all the optical microscopy illumination techniques. Sample illumination is transmitted (i.e., illuminated from below and observed from above) white light, and contrast in the sample is caused by attenuation of the transmitted light in dense areas of the sample. Bright-field microscopy is the simplest of a range of techniques used for illumination of samples in light microscopes, and its simplicity makes it a popular technique. The typical appearance of a bright-field microscopy image is a dark sample on a bright background, hence the name.

Bright field microscopy Light path

The light path of a bright-field microscope is extremely simple, no additional components are required beyond the normal light-microscope setup. The light path therefore consists of:

a transillumination light source, commonly a halogen lamp in the microscope stand;
a condenser lens, which focuses light from the light source onto the sample;
an objective lens, which collects light from the sample and magnifies the image;
oculars and/or a camera to view the sample image.

Bright-field microscopy may use critical or Köhler illumination to illuminate the sample.

Bright field microscopy Performance

Bright-field microscopy typically has low contrast with most biological samples, as few absorb light to a great extent. Staining is often required to increase contrast, which prevents use on live cells in many situations. Bright-field illumination is useful for samples that have an intrinsic color, for example chloroplasts in plant cells.Bright-field microscopy is a standard light-microscopy technique, and therefore magnification is limited by the resolving power possible with the wavelength of visible light.

Bright field microscopy Advantages

Simplicity of setup with only basic equipment required.
Living cells can be seen with bright-field microscopes

Bright field microscopy Limitations

Very low contrast of most biological samples.
The practical limit to magnification with a light microscope is around 1300X. Although higher magnifications are possible, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain image clarity as the magnification increases.
Low apparent optical resolution due to the blur of out-of-focus material.
Samples that are naturally colorless and transparent cannot be seen well, e.g. many types of mammalian cells. These samples often have to be stained before viewing. Samples that do have their own color can be seen without preparation, e.g. the observation of cytoplasmic streaming in Chara cells.

Bright field microscopy Enhancements

Reducing or increasing the amount of the light source by the iris diaphragm.
Use of an oil-immersion objective lens and a special immersion oil placed on a glass cover over the specimen. Immersion oil has the same refraction as glass and improves the resolution of the observed specimen.
Use of sample-staining methods for use in microbiology, such as simple stains (methylene blue, safranin, crystal violet) and differential stains (negative stains, flagellar stains, endospore stains).
Use of a colored (usually blue) or polarizing filter on the light source to highlight features not visible under white light. The use of filters is especially useful with mineral samples.

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

What is dark field microscopy?

Brightfield microscopy uses light from the lamp source under the microscope stage to illuminate the specimen. This light is gathered in the condenser, then shaped into a cone where the apex is focused on the plane of the specimen. In order to view a specimen under a brightfield microscope, the light rays that pass through it must be changed enough in order to interfere with each other (or contrast) and therefore, build an image. At times, a specimen will have a refractive index very similar to the surrounding medium between the microscope stage and the objective lens. When this happens, the image can not be seen. In order to visualize these biological materials well, they must have a contrast caused by the proper refractive indices, or be artificially stained. Since staining can kill specimens, there are times when dark field microscopy is used instead.

In dark field microscopy the condenser is designed to form a hollow cone of light (see illustration below), as apposed to brightfield microscopy that illuminates the sample with a full cone of light. In dark field microscopy, the objective lens sits in the dark hollow of this cone and light travels around the objective lens, but does not enter the cone shaped area. The entire field of view appears dark when there is no sample on the microscope stage. However, when a sample is placed on the stage it appears bright against a dark background. It is similar to back-lighting an object that may be the same color as the background it sits against – in order to make it stand out.

 

What PARTS of dark field microscopy?

These are three requisites for adopting an ordinary microscope for Dark ground illumination:
1 Dark ground condenser
2 Suitable light intensity lamp
3 Funnel stop (to reduce numerical aperture of objective)
USES:
1. To visualize Trepenoma pallidum in exudates.
2. To visualize Leptospira species in blood & urine.
3. To visualize Spirillum minus in blood.
4. To detect motility of other bacteria.

5. To identify sheathed microfilaria & other parasites

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

Bright field microscopy vs Dark field microscopy

-When you view a particular specimen under a bright field microscope, you will observe that the specimen is dark while its background is bright; hence the name bright field microscope.
On the other hand, when you view a particular specimen under a dark field microscope, you will observe that the specimen is bright while its background is dark; hence the name dark field microscope.
-Since little light actually falls on the specimen, dark-field illumination shows less detail overall than bright-field illumination.

bright field microscopy.
A way of illuminating a specimen in a microscope by lighting it from behind, making the specimen appear dark against a bright background. It is considered the most basic type of microscope

The dark field microscopy requires blocking out the central light waves along the optical axis of the light waves. Blocking the light waves allows you to see the specimine when only the oblique rays hit the specimen at an angle.
Parts of the Microscope.
Monitor: To display the picture of the specimen your CMO objective lens is focused on.

CMO Objective lens: To magnify on the part of a specimen you wish to observe.

Stage: To hold your specimen.

Lamp Voltage: Controls how bright the light is.

Zoom Body: To zoom in on the specimen.

Illumination section: Illuminates the specimen.

Brightfield/Darkfield Diascopic Stand. Holds the inner pieces of the microscope inside.

Camera Control: Controls where the CMO Objective lens focuses on.

Economic observation tube: Allows you to see the specimen without the monitor.

Digital camera: Transfers the pixels onto the moniter so you can see the specimen.

Stage: Holds the microscope together and supports the microsope.

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