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how does dark field microscopy work Here’s a Quick Way to know

how does dark field microscopy work Here’s a Quick Way to know

working principle of dark field microscopy

working principle of dark field microscopy

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

Microscopes are used to magnify objects. Through magnification, an image is made to appear larger than the original object. The magnification of an object can be calculated roughly by multiplying the magnification of the objective lens times the magnification of the ocular lens. Objects are magnified to be able to see small details. There is no limit to the magnification that can be achieved; however, there is a magnification beyond which detail does not become clearer. The result is called empty magnification when objects are made bigger but their details do not become clearer. Therefore, not only magnification but resolution is important to the quality of the information in an image.

The resolving power of the microscope is defined as the ability to distinguish two points apart from each other. The resolution of a microscope is dependent on a number of factors in its construction. There is also an inherent theoretical limit to resolution imposed by the wavelength of visible light (400-600nm). The theoretical limit of resolution (the smallest distance able to be seen between two points) is calculated as:

Resolution = 0.61 l/N.A.

where l represents the wavelength of light used and N.A.is the numerical aperture. The student-grade microscopes generally have much lower resolution than the theoretical limit because of lower quality lenses and illumination systems.

Standard brightfield microscopy relies upon light from the lamp source being gathered by the substage condenser and shaped into a cone whose apex is focused at the plane of the specimen. Specimens are seen because of their ability to change the speed and the path of the light passing through them. This ability is dependent upon the refractive index and the opacity of the specimen. To see a specimen in a brightfield microscope, the light rays passing through it must be changed sufficiently to be able to interfere with each other which produces contrast (differences in light intensities) and, thereby, build an image. If the specimen has a refractive index too similar to the surrounding medium between the microscope stage and the objective lens, it will not be seen. To visualize biological materials well, the materials must have this inherent contrast caused by the proper refractive indices or be artificially stained. These limitations require instructors to find naturally high contrast materials or to enhance contrast by staining them which often requires killing them. Adequately visualizing transparent living materials or thin unstained specimens is not possible with a brightfield microscope.

Darkfield microscopy relies on a different illumination system. Rather than illuminating the sample with a filled cone of light, the condenser is designed to form a hollow cone of light. The light at the apex of the cone is focused at the plane of the specimen; as this light moves past the specimen plane it spreads again into a hollow cone. The objective lens sits in the dark hollow of this cone; although the light travels around and past the objective lens, no rays enter it (Fig. 1). The entire field appears dark when there is no sample on the microscope stage; thus the name darkfield microscopy. When a sample is on the stage, the light at the apex of the cone strikes it. The image is made only by those rays scattered by the sample and captured in the objective lens (note the rays scattered by the specimen in Figure 1). The image appears bright against the dark background. This situation can be compared to the glittery appearance of dust particles in a dark room illuminated by strong shafts of light coming in through a side window. The dust particles are very small, but are easily seen when they scatter the light rays. This is the working principle of darkfield microscopy and explains how the image of low contrast material is created: an object will be seen against a dark background if it scatters light which is captured with the proper device such as an objective lens.how does dark field microscopy work

The highest quality darkfield microscopes are equipped with specialized costly condensers constructed only for darkfield application. This darkfield effect can be achieved in a brightfield microscope, however, by the addition of a simple “stop”. The stop is a piece of opaque material placed below the substage condenser; it blocks out the center of the beam of light coming from the base of the microscope and forms the hollow cone of light needed for dark field microscopy.

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

how does dark field microscopy work

How to Make a dark field microscopy

You don’t need to buy a huge expensive set-up to experiment with dark field illumination.

To create a dark field, an opaque circle called a patchstop is placed in the condenser of the microscope. The patchstop prevents direct light from reaching the objective lens, and the only light that does reach the lens is reflected or refracted by the specimen. Easy enough, right?

If you want to make a dark field microscopy you’ll first need a regular light microscope. Below is your full list of “ingredients”:

dark field microscopyMicroscope
Hole punch
Black construction paper
Transparency film
Glue
Scissors
Pen
Now use the following steps to make your patchstop:

Set up your microscope and choose the lowest-power objective lens.
Set the eyepiece aside somewhere safe.
Open the diaphragm as wide as possible. Then slowly close it until is just encroaches on the circle of visible light.
Now bend over and take a look at the diaphragm from below. See that opening? It’s only slightly smaller than the finished patchstop you’ll create.
Punch a few circles in the black construction paper with the hole punch. Measure one against the diaphragm opening. If it’s more than 10% larger, cut it down to about that size (10% larger than the diaphragm opening). If it’s smaller, cut out a larger circle.
Cut a 5 cm square of transparency paper.
Glue the black circle onto the transparency film, about 2 cm from the corner of the square. In that free 2 cm of paper, write the correct magnification power of your objective.
Mark the patchstop with the correct magnification power.
Repeat the above steps for all the objective powers except the oil immersion lenses.
Now use your patchstop to turn a light field unit into a dark field microscopy:

Select the correct patchstop for the objective power to be used.
Slip the patchstop between the filter holder and condenser. If your microscope has no filter, hold it manually below the condenser.
Remove the eyepiece.
Open the diaphragm and move the patchstop until the light is blocked entirely. Use tape to secure it if there is no condenser on your microscope.
Replace the eyepiece and examine the sample.
As you can see, a dark field microscopy can let users see specimens in a whole new way, bringing those into focus that don’t stand out under intense light. Using dark field illumination can open up a whole new view of microscopy
The first picture of the plankton was taken by Uwe Kils and is from Wikipedia under the GNU Free Documentation License.

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

dark field microscopy

 

What Advantages of dark field microscopy

A dark field microscopy is ideal for viewing objects that are unstained, transparent and absorb little or no light.

These specimens often have similar refractive indices as their surroundings, making them hard to distinguish with other illumination techniques.

You can use dark field to study marine organisms such as algae and plankton, diatoms, insects, fibers, hairs, yeast and protozoa as well as some minerals and crystals, thin polymers and some ceramics.

You can also use dark field in the research of live bacterium, as well as mounted cells and tissues.

It is more useful in examining external details, such as outlines, edges, grain boundaries and surface defects than internal structure.

dark field microscopy is often dismissed for more modern observation techniques such as phase contrast and DIC, which provide more accurate, higher contrasted images and can be used to observe a greater number of specimens.

Recently, dark field has regained some of its popularity when combined with other illumination techniques, such as fluorescence, which widens its possible employment in certain fields.

 

 

What dark field microscopy Applications

Viewing blood cells (biological dark field microscopy, combined with phase contrast)
Viewing bacteria (biological dark field microscopy, often combined with phase contrast)
Viewing different types of algae (biological dark field microscopy)
Viewing hairline metal fractures (metallurgical dark field microscopy)
Viewing diamonds and other precious stones (gemological microscope or stereo dark field microscopy)
Viewing shrimp or other invertebrates (stereo dark field microscopy)

In dark field microscopy, contrast is created by a bright specimen on a dark background. It is ideal for revealing outlines, edges, boundaries, and refractive index gradients but does not provide a great deal of information about internal structure. Ideal subjects include living, unstained cells (where darkfield illumination provides information not visible with other techniques), although fixed stains cells can also be imaged successfully. Darkfield imaging is particularly useful in haematology for the examination of fresh blood. Non-biological specimens include minerals, chemical crystals, colloidal particles, inclusions and porosity in glass, ceramics, and polymer thin sections.

 

 

 

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