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What is darkfield blood analysis?

What is darkfield blood analysis?

darkfield blood analysis

darkfield blood analysis

darkfield blood analysis

darkfield blood analysis

You may find it difficult to locate many medical doctors that use this technique. The FDA does not approve of dark field microscopic blood analysis, therefore many doctor’s hands are tied. Viewing a fresh, natural blood sample (a sample not altered with any stains, etc., needed for normal microscopic exams), under the technology of a dark field microscope, will reveal conditions of your blood not normally even considered during the diagnosis of a normal blood test performed in doctor’s office or a lab.

However, an increasing number of health professionals have found that the use of this technique allows inspection of cellular dynamics which as noted above normally escape analysis or diagnosis using orthodox medical tests.

A dark field microscope is a microscope designed to permit diversion of light rays and illumination, from the side, so that details appear light against a dark background; as opposed to light passing straight through the specimen. If bright lights from the microscope pass directly through the specimen, the heat from the light source will kill the red blood cells (RBC)s faster. Also, by diverting the light rays, a greater amount of depth and details can be viewed. (Almost like a three-dimension view).

Dark Field Microscopy thus allows a health professional to evaluate the shapes and other properties of individual blood cells, indicating nutritional conditions which can be adversely affecting a person’s health. The advantage of this analysis over standard blood tests, which detect chemical changes in the blood, is the ability of dark field microscopy to detect nutritional disorders sooner, when the problem is in its infancy stages. By monitoring the blood’s condition, a health professional can assist in “balancing” the blood by giving dietary and lifestyle recommendations which can enhance health.

This microscopic photograph of healthy, powerful blood shows the red blood cells to be round, evenly shaped and freely floating in plasma. The plasma itself is clear with a few fat globules. There are no signs of clotting, bacteria, fungus, disease or stress. This is the kind of blood a healthy person should have flowing through their circulatory system

In darkfield microscopy, one is therefore able to observe “live blood.” Unlike the techniques of electron microscopy, no fixative is used so the picture is one of mobility rather than fixity. With stains and fixatives, the picture reveals a moment in time rather than a continuum.

What one sees in the mobile situation are the usual red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma—and what is floating in the plasma. Microbial activity, undigested food, fungi, and crystals are all apparent as is the capacity of the red blood cells to circulate and the white blood cells to devour morbid matter.

As we know, red blood cells transport oxygen to the tissues of the body. Without oxygen, we are devitalized, and according to some theories, the tissues go into a morbid state in which they can survive on fermentation rather than oxygenation. This is what is referred to as anaerobic and it is believed, by such persons as Nobel laureate Prof. Otto Warburg, that cancer thrives in such oxygen deficient conditions.

With darkfield microscopy, one often sees sees a condition called “rouleau” in which the red blood cells are stacked together as shown below. Some people believe it is because of the stress on the body of poor metabolism and others believe it is due to this as well as pH (acid-alkaline balance), wrong dietary choices or the presence of excessively high levels of free radicals. In any event, it is usually correctable.

Another condition that is often revealed in these tests is one in which the activity of red blood cells is compromised because of infection, bacterial or viral. In some cases, the red blood cells are misshapen or debilitated by parasitic invasion.

In the photograph above, the “rouleau” effect shows that the red blood cells are clumped together and stacked like coins. Rouleau affects proper oxygenation because the red blood cells do not circulate well enough to deliver oxygen where it is needed.

The condition also favors the growth of unhealthy organisms that can survive in a milieu that is less oxygen rich. Fungi, bacteria, and viruses require less oxygen than healthy tissue.

In the case of rouleau, since oxygenation is really critical to well being, the right diet and herbs may alleviate one of the underlying factors that contributes to cancer. However, enzymes, avoidance of the wrong foods, and protocols that address the specific issues of the patient would be expected to be more effective than more random efforts to ward off ill health.

For instance, one may or may not be iron deficient, but one may have room for improvement in diet and digestion as well as perhaps liver and immune function. Detoxification and decongestion can also be helpful.

Typically, a detoxifying herb will also be decongesting and sometimes also somewhat anti-parasitic, but not all herbal alkaloids are the same and not all formulae have the same actions. Therefore consultation with a practitioner who is knowledgeable in the areas that are pertinent is practical and, more importantly, often wise!

If the real problem is infection—and devitalization or cancer are secondary to infection—it is important to address the infection so that the red blood cells can “get back to their primary task,” which, of course, is to deliver oxygen to the tissues.

The idea that cancer is a disease of degeneration has had its fashionable phases and its days of rejection. The issue of whether an abnormal condition could perpetuate itself in a healthy internal environment, what is called “biological terrain” in the literature, is also debated but not resolved.

What you can expect from Dark Field Blood Analysis

Thus, the dark field blood analysis provides information about the function and structure of blood cells and plasma endobionts, as well as developing bacterial and fungal precursors. The dark field examination also indicates changes within the cell through hormonal and mineral deficiencies. It is particularly beneficial for the evaluation of patients with chronic diseases, and children with susceptibility to infection, or recurrent bacterial problems, such as Candida or other fungal diseases. Dark field blood analysis is crucial in answering questions related to any chronic, or toxic problems.

Dark field microscopy is also an important tool in biological therapies. It can be used to test the effect of certain medications, by adding the medication to a blood sample and analyzing the reaction that is produced. This investigation is extremely motivating for the patient, by allowing him to directly experience the diagnosis.

The effects of dark field microscopy can not be replaced by any other blood test, especially not by normal laboratory microscopic blood tests, sent in fixed samples, as the blood changes its function due to environmental changes, so the blood must be tested while it is still fresh. It is also important to evaluate the degeneration tendency of blood samples, especially when considering the behavior of tumors.

The presence of bacteria precursors, which are not disease-inducing, but increase the risk of future disease development, can also be found in the dark field examination. Therefore, this dark field examination of the blood is a valuable and necessary preventative measure.

What is Darkfield Illumination?

All of us are quite familiar with the appearance and visibility of stars on a dark night, this despite their enormous distances from the Earth. Stars can be readily observed at night primarily because of the stark contrast between their faint light and the black sky.

Yet stars are shining both night and day, but they are invisible during the day because the overwhelming brightness of the sun “blots out” the faint light from the stars, rendering them invisible. During a total solar eclipse, the moon moves between the Earth and the sun blocking out the light of the sun and the stars can now be seen even though it is daytime. In short, the visibility of the faint star light is enormously enhanced against a dark background.

This principle is applied in darkfield (also called darkground) microscopy, a simple and popular method for making unstained transparent specimens clearly visible. Such objects often have refractive indices very close in value to that of their surroundings and are difficult to image in conventional brightfield microscopy. For instance, many small aquatic organisms have a refractive index ranging from 1.2 to 1.4, resulting in a negligible optical difference from the surrounding aqueous medium. These are ideal candidates for darkfield illumination.

Darkfield illumination requires blocking out of the central light which ordinarily passes through and around (surrounding) the specimen, allowing only oblique rays from every azimuth to “strike” the specimen mounted on the microscope slide. The top lens of a simple Abbe darkfield condenser is spherically concave, allowing light rays emerging from the surface in all azimuths to form an inverted hollow cone of light with an apex centered in the specimen plane. If no specimen is present and the numerical aperture of the condenser is greater than that of the objective, the oblique rays cross and all such rays will miss entering the objective because of their obliquity. The field of view will appear dark.

The darkfield condenser/objective pair illustrated in Figure 1 is a high-numerical aperture arrangement that represents darkfield microscopy in its most sophisticated configuration, which will be discussed in detail below. The objective contains an internal iris diaphragm that serves to reduce the numerical aperture of the objective to a value below that of the inverted hollow light cone emitted by the condenser. The cardioid condenser is a reflecting darkfield design that relies on internal mirrors to project an aberration-free cone of light onto the specimen plane.

When a specimen is placed on the slide, especially an unstained, non-light absorbing specimen, the oblique rays cross the specimen and are diffracted, reflected, and/or refracted by optical discontinuities (such as the cell membrane, nucleus, and internal organelles) allowing these faint rays to enter the objective. The specimen can then be seen bright on an otherwise black background. In terms of Fourier optics, darkfield illumination removes the zeroth order (unscattered light) from the diffraction pattern formed at the rear focal plane of the objective. This results in an image formed exclusively from higher order diffraction intensities scattered by the specimen.

The photomicrographs in Figure 2 illustrate the effects of darkfield and brightfield illumination on silica skeletons from a small marine protozoan (radiolarian) in a whole mount specimen. In ordinary brightfield, skeletal features of the radiolarian are not well defined and tend to be washed out in photomicrographs recorded either with traditional film or digitally captured.  was taken in brightfield illumination with the condenser aperture diaphragm closed to a point where diffraction artifacts obscure some of the sample detail. This enhances specimen contrast at the expense of image distortion. Under darkfield illumination, more detail is present, especially in the upper portion of the organism, and the image acquires an apparent three-dimensional appearance. When a red filter is used in conjunction with a darkfield stop , the radiolarian takes on a colorful appearance that is more pleasing, although no additional detail is produced and there is even some reduction in image quality.

Specimens that have smooth reflective surfaces produce images due, in part, to reflection of light into the objective. In situations where the refractive index is different from the surrounding medium or where refractive index gradients occur (as in the edge of a membrane), light is refracted by the specimen. Both instances of reflection and refraction produce relatively small angular changes in the direction of light, allowing some to enter the objective. In contrast, some light striking the specimen is also diffracted, producing a 180-degree arc of light that passes through the entire numerical aperture range of the objective. The resolving power of the

 What PRINCIPLE of dark ground microscope?

The compound microscope may be fitted with a dark field condenser that has a numerical aperture (resolving power) greater than the objective. The condenser also contains a dark-field stop. The compound microscope now becomes a dark-field microscope. Light passing through the specimen is diffracted and enters the objective lens, whereas undiffracted light does not, resulting in a bright image against a dark background. Objects are seen as light objects against a dark background.

What is Dark field illumination Applications ?

Viewing Blood cells.
Viewing bacteria.
Viewing different types of algae.
Viewing hairline metal fractures.
Viewing diamonds and other precious stones.
Viewing shrimp and other vertebrae.
Advantages and Disadvantages of Bright Field Microscopy.
Application of Bright Field Illumination
-This technique is widely used in pathology to
view fixed tissue sections or cell films/smears
-In biological applications, brightfield observation is widely used for stained or naturally pigmented or highly contrasted specimens mounted on a glass microscope slide.

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